Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 37-43
Evaluation of Orange Flesh Sweet Potato Varieties (Ipomoea batatas L.) in West Hararghe Zone of Oromia Region, Eastern Ethiopia
Gezahegn Assefa, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Mechara Agricultural Research Center, Horticulture and Spice Research Team, Mechara, Ethiopia
Sintayehu Girma, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Mechara Agricultural Research Center, Horticulture and Spice Research Team, Mechara, Ethiopia
Dereje Deresa, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Mechara Agricultural Research Center, Horticulture and Spice Research Team, Mechara, Ethiopia
Received: Apr. 4, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 22, 2020;       Published: Oct. 30, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.bmb.20200503.12      View  58      Downloads  15
Abstract
Sweet potato is an important food security root crop in west Hararghe. it is mainly important for pregnant women and children particularly the Orange fleshed type, which produces storage-carotene, roots precursor of rich in Vitamin A. Therefore, Orange fleshed sweet potato is a promising variety to address the Vitamin A deficiency needs of women and children and to prevent malnutrition in study areas. This experiment was undertaken at Daro labu and Habro districts during 2016-2017 cropping season. The objective of the research was to identify high yielding, adaptable and disease tolerant variety to the study area. A total of three improved Orange fleshed sweet potato varieties; Beletech, Kulfo, Tulla and one local check were used as experimental materials. The experiment was arranged in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three replications. The analysis of variance revealed that there was a significant difference (p<0.05) among the varieties for growth, yield and yield related trait. The highest mean value of marketable root yield was recorded from Kulfo variety with (15.2 ton ha-1) and 0.55 ton yield advantage than a local check. During the experimental period, there was low rainfall distribution in west Hararghe, particularly in the study site. Within the existing moisture stress, Kulfo variety was performed well and gave higher root yielder than improved and local check at both locations. In addition to this, the stability analysis result shows that variety Kulfo was the most stable variety across the two sites. Likewise, the yield and yield contributing parameters and stability analysis over location are important selection parameters which can serve as indicators of adaptability of the sweet potato to the study area and can also be utilized for improving in root yield of sweet potato. Therefore, Kulfo variety was selected as high yield in, adaptable and stress tolerant variety under the rainfed condition at Daro labu and Habro districts of West Hararghe.
Keywords
Beta Carotene, Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato, Root Length and Root Yield
To cite this article
Gezahegn Assefa, Sintayehu Girma, Dereje Deresa, Evaluation of Orange Flesh Sweet Potato Varieties (Ipomoea batatas L.) in West Hararghe Zone of Oromia Region, Eastern Ethiopia, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2020, pp. 37-43. doi: 10.11648/j.bmb.20200503.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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